Je gebruikt een verouwderde browser. Upgrade je browser voor een betere surfervaring op deze website.

Building a persona in 4 steps

Use personas to know your audience, says Omar Mohout, author of From Idea to Product/Market Fit

Using personas to know your audience

A persona is a marketing concept that helps you to pretend it is the person to tell your story to.

The average user doesn’t exist. Yet, it make sense to create groups of people in your target audience that share the same characteristics. That’s what is called a “persona”.

Behind that persona are real people who you will be talking to at some point. It’s highly advisable to use at least 3 different personas. For business- to-business products, create a separate persona for the various roles who are involved in buying your product or service. A company may have multiple buying personas. Typically they are:

  • Ambassador: does the internal selling and has access to the decision-makers;
  • Sponsor: has enough clout in the company, regardless of title, to push it through, even if there is no budget for it;
  • Financial sponsor: authorising the budget and negotiating the deal.

from idea to product

In B2B, the return on investment (RoI), the depth of client relationship, the decision-making process, perceived risks and the industry context are all of paramount importance. Make sure you take them into consideration when creating personas. Using a persona is also useful in creating different landing pages, at least one for each persona. Each landing page should speak to the persona answering one of their pain points, using language the persona understands.

 

Building a persona in 4 steps

STEP 1
Answer the following questions:

PERSONA NEED WANT BUY
Who am I serving? What do they need? What can I offer? How can I reach them?

Example:

Founder

Example:

Price Setting

Example:

Pricing Framework

Example:

Book on Amazon

STEP 2
Create a fictional persona that represents your customer providing the details below:

  • Name

  • Education/Occupation

  • Other relevant details

  • Service attitude: Do-It-Yourself / Advice seeker / Delegator
    Is your persona someone who figures everything out on his/her own?

persona

Provide context

STEP 3
Describe your persona in the context of the (future) service. What are his or her objectives, both rational and emotional? Be sure to use characteristics that you indicated at Step 2.

  • Who are they?

  • Where are they?

  • What do they need?

  • Who are the people they follow and like the most?

  • What do they read?

  • What do they eat?

  • How do they speak?

  • What tools do they use?

  • What are their problems?

Make a list with answers to the following questions:

happyWhat can make your customer happy when using the service?

 

sadWhat can deter your customer from using the service?

 

 

In-depth analysis

STEP 4
360° view:

SOCIAL 

OCCUPATIONAL 

SPIRITUAL 

PHYSICAL 

EMOTIONAL 

COGNITIVE

 Relationships

Career

Peace

Habits

Needs

Education

 Attitude

Ambition

Harmony

Physical Activities

Wants

Learning ability

 Empathy

 Satisfaction

Values

Disabilities

Desires

Reading ability 

Interaction 

Achievements 

Purposes 

Lifestyle 

State of mind 

Open to ideas 

Communities 

Development 

 Wholeness

Gender 

Feelings 

Curiosity 

Families 

Financial 

 Commitment

Health 

Sharing 

Planning 

Friends 

Drive to succeed 

 

Stress 

Stress 

Tech 

     

Preferences

Self-awareness

Use of technology

Improve your chances of success

succes

Understanding a market and creating personas is something early-stage startups don’t like doing. They want cool products, funding, website traffic, users and plenty of press coverage. Yet, all these are an effect, not a cause. Doing research, sales and customer development greatly improves the chances of success.

 

 

 

 

Meer lezen? 

» Vraag het boek hier aan

from idea to product   market fit


Lees ook

Blijf op de hoogte en schrijf je in op onze nieuwsbrief